USF Law’s Reaction to LMU’s GPA Boost Policy

A friend of mine recently emailed and meet with the Dean of USF Law regarding the possibly of grade inflation. Check the email and response below:

I am currently a 2L, and normally would not write an email to you but I feel like this deserves some attention. Here’s the story I would like to talk to you about:
http://abovethelaw.com/2010/03/loyola-law-school-la-retroactively-inflates-grades/. I understand that USF is not in Southern California but as someone who is looking to practice down in LA once I graduate, this article and new system that Loyola has implemented does not bode well for me at all. Not to mention, I know that USC already has a much more lenient curve then we do. Do you think our administration can take some time and actually see if this would be feasible for our school as well? I know that our curves are tough and probably similar to, if not more strict than Loyola’s.

The reaction from the Dean? I only have snippets of quotes because the dean met with the student in person. Here are some of his quotes:  “We agree to to disagree,”  “you are benefiting from something similar put in place a few years ago,” “we have academic integrity,” “employers know the difference,” and finally “our students are brilliant. They will all end up doing ok.”

My Thoughts Below:

  • 1) GPA is extremely important for those of us who would like to have jobs right after we graduate from law school. Since when is GPA NOT a determining factor? I am positive that almost every employer who participated in USF’s OCI (On Campus Interviews) requested or preferred students in the top 10 to 15% of the class.
  • 2) Do employers really know the difference? I don’t think they will because most firms, especially one’s in the Bay Area will likely not be in tune with the academic policies of law schools in Southern California. It’s quite a large assumption to say that all employers looking to hire fresh graduates from law school will know the difference when it comes to different law school grading systems.
  • 3) Isn’t every law school supposed to have “academic integrity”? Does that mean employers who look to hire LMU student’s will notice that their law school’s grading policy was perhaps lacking academic integrity, not likely.
  • 4) I would like to know exactly what policy USF implemented a few years from which we are all allegedly benefiting from, because I sure feel like summer jobs for USF 1L and 2L’s are increasingly hard to find as the summer get’s closer.
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One Response to “USF Law’s Reaction to LMU’s GPA Boost Policy”

  1. I dont know exactly what the terms of the new policy were, but to my understanding it raised the median grade from a C+ to a B-. When I started law school the 2L’s and 3L’s were in uproar about the grade changes, but they didnt protest much because the administration was simply following suit with the changes being implemented at most of the tier 1 law schools. My guess is that Loyola is just making the change that the dean is referring to.
    This situation reminds me of high school GPA/SAT scores, which have been rising for years. My 3.4/1220 is no worse than a newbies 4.0/1300. They just need more extra-ciriculars now to distinguish themselves from all the other 4.0’s. Employers/schools will always go with the better applicant, which does not necessarily mean better grades. My law school grades are mediocre, but I am rediculously good looking, extremely charming, and well endowed. I am the type of person you could spend 12 hours in an elevator with (which is what employers are really looking for). That’s why I have a job coming out dis motha.

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